Blackboard Satisfaction Survey Results – First Look

May 11, 2011

As part of the Palomar College Academic Technology department’s efforts to measure success (and thus meet some reporting requirements), we invited the Palomar Faculty who were assigned to available Blackboard courses this term to take a satisfaction survey.

We (like so many others) used SurveyMonkey to conduct the survey, which worked very well.  The invitation went out to 601 faculty members, of which 301 actually responded; I cannot say how happy I am with that sort of survey return rate!  The survey period ended last Friday afternoon, so I’m finally able to sit down and wrestle with the results.  For a first look at those results, I’m going to post publicly the more “aggregate” data; later posts will deal with the results of the (more important, to my mind) open ended questions asked at the end of the survey.

The image describes the detailed results, but the gist of the first question set tells me that although 79.4% of faculty surveyed are satisfied with Blackboard overall, far less are satisfied with the ease of use, with 17.3% being unsatisfied on that issue.

Survey Question 1 data results

Again the details are in the image, but next up was an opinion-style set asking about ease of student login, course material setup, and test setup.  Unsurprisingly, only 30.5% of faculty agreed that tests are easy to set up.  (Frankly I’m amazed that many responded such. I don’t consider the process to be easy, and I teach others how to do it!)  84% of faculty agreed that student login was easy… I’ve no idea how we could make it easier than the current “same as you used to enroll in classes” though.

Survey detailed data results

Finishing out the agree/disagree questions, 68.9% of faculty agreed that Blackboard has improved their communication with students, while 66.2% agreed that Blackboard created new opportunities to teach and learn.  I am thrilled to death by these results.

Detailed survey results

I found the responses given to “how many years have you been using Blackboard at Palomar College” to be interesting, because according to our results we’ve had roughly the same number of faculty start using it across the last five years.  Also we have faculty claiming to have been using Blackboard here at Palomar for longer than Palomar has used Blackboard… but that’s likely just a matter of remembering years wrong.

Detailed survey results

We finished up the objective questions by asking which Blackboard features faculty use.  My take-away from this is that either I have no idea how faculty actually use their Blackboard courses, or that faculty don’t know the proper names of the tools and components in their course sites.  (I’m hoping it’s the latter, because I just cannot believe that only 40.3% of faculty use the Item.)

Detailed survey data

The survey finished with three open questions:

  1. What do you like best about Blackboard?
  2. What do you like least about Blackboard?
  3. If you could, what would you change about Blackboard?

I’ll delve into some of the information from these responses in other posts, but to my mind that’s where the real meat of the useful information will be.

So, looking back on all this data, if you have any thoughts you’d like to share, please notice that prominent box at the bottom of the page to leave comments.


Big Brother is Watching

March 5, 2010

Sometimes I look through the statistics for this blog, to see what people are looking at (not much) and any data on how folks got here.  It can be amusing to see the search results that lead people here, but one I saw today I just have to comment on.  The search term was “can professors see if students have logged in”…

Yes.

Dear students, if you are required to log in to a system, someone somewhere on the system is logging it, guaranteed.  In fact, the instructor has two related places where they can see the last day and time you accessed the Blackboard course:  the Performance Dashboard and the Grade Center.  So if your professor tells you that she’ll be docking points if you don’t check the course each week, she actually can tell, easily.

This blog may be “Blackboard for Faculty”, but I’m not above giving students the heads up: Big Brother is watching you.  Do your work.