Avoiding Audio Assumption

February 25, 2011

During a workshop later today on the topic of “Building Your Course” in Blackboard, I’m going to cover a segment I refer to as “Can You Hear Me Now?”  In this segment we are going to be using the Wimba Voice Authoring tool (which Palomar has been licensing from Wimba for several years, well before they were purchased by Blackboard and rolled into the Collaborate project).  The idea is to leave brief audio annotations in line with the rest of the textual content of a course, both to highlight key points and to aid in correct pronunciation of terms by students.

Now, for those purposes, the Wimba Voice Author tool really does work great.  The most difficult part in using that tool to create content, as I’ve said on many an occasion, is making sure the microphone is plugged in right.

As I was prepping for the workshop a thought struck me uncommonly strongly though.  Using this tool really is making an assumption; specifically the assumption that all the students will be able to hear the recording.

Now, technical barriers are fairly low here.  To play back the audio from a Wimba Voice Author component a computer needs to have Java installed (which is no real problem, as it’s freely available online), and have a sound card and speakers or headphones (which, realistically, isn’t a problem either with any recent make of computer).  The student also needs to be able to hear.

Just as it is important to provide textual (and therefore screen reader readable) descriptions in the alt text box for any images you use, it is important to ensure your material is not exclusively available to those who can listen to it.  Here at Palomar we try to have all video material (when processed by the Academic Technology and Educational Television departments) captioned before it is put online, but that just isn’t practical for an individual instructor’s one-off recorded remarks.

So, although I do heartily encourage use of audio annotation to enhance the materials in a Blackboard course, use it carefully.  Try to avoid an assumption of audio, so that should you find a deaf student enrolled in your class you don’t end up having to scramble to provide equivalents to the sound playback.